Capacitor Conversions
 

How do I convert from nF to uF, etc.?

Capacitor values can sometimes be a bit confusing, because of different labeling conventions.  Following is a table showing the relationships between the  most commonly used capacitor suffixes.
pF = picofarads    = 1*10-12 Farads
nF = nanofarads   = 1*10-9 Farads
uF = microfarads  = 1* 10-6 Farads
In order to convert from one to the other, the following multiplication factors apply:
 
To convert from:
To:
Multiply by:
pF
nF
1*10-3
pF
uF
1*10-6
nF
pF
1*103
nF
uF
1*10-3
uF
pF
1*106
uF
nF
1*103
 
Example - nF to uF: If you have a 2.2nF capacitor (sometimes labeled "2n2") and want to know the value in uF,  multiply by 1*10-3 as follows:
2.2nF *(1*10-3) = 0.0022uF
Note that multiplying by 10-3 is the same as moving the decimal point three places to the left.
Example - uF to nF: If you have a 0.01uF capacitor  and want to know the value in nF, multiply by 1*103 , or 1000, as follows:
0.01uF *(1*103) = 10nF
Note that multiplying by 103 is the same as moving the decimal point three places to the right.
Example - uF to pF: If you have a 0.001uF capacitor and want to know the value in pF, multiply by 1*106 as follows:
0.001uF *(1*106) = 1000pF
Note that multiplying by 106 is the same as moving the decimal point six places to the right.
Example - pF to uF: If you have a 2200pF capacitor and want to know the value in uF,  multiply by 1*10-6 as follows:
2200pF *(1*10-6) = 0.0022uF
Note that multiplying by 10-6 is the same as moving the decimal point six places to the left.
Example - pF to nF: If you have a 1000pF capacitor and want to know the value in nF, multiply by 1*10-3 as follows:
1000pF *(1*10-3) = 1nF
Note that multiplying by 10-3 is the same as moving the decimal point three places to the left.
Copyright © 2000,  Randall Aiken.  May not be reproduced in any form without written approval from Aiken Amplification.

Revised 02/18/14